Artists Build Content Promotion Machines for Music Marketing

by Matt @ Kurb on August 16, 2010

More music marketing notes – you’re a fly on the wall right here! I mean that in the nicest way. Do you need someone to help out with your music marketing? That’s what I do, I charge $250p/month.

There’s only one of me, and with my team building up, you’d do well to go in on some serious music marketing and promotions to make it happen for you as an artist. We’re about online promotion and online business, that means the bit where you see some money.

Email: kurbpromo@gmail.com

Well I have an assistant here now, plus I tend to group things into 5 hour tasks so they can be accomplished easily. This is letting me get a lot more done.

It’s good to think outside the sqaure with income, think long term, think like a marketer. Branding. If you’ve only got 1000 fans you don’t have a brand, no one knows who you are. When thousands of people recognise what you are and what you represent, THEN you have a brand.

Most of the time I’m helping artists just get to that stage. I don’t promise fame. You’ve got to be GOOD!
I’m not sure at this stage how you’ll get fans to volunteer much demographic information, i’m not experienced in that area, though I can see how certain campaigns, especially online advertising and use of google analytics could arm you with the information about who is visiting the sites. There’s licensing potential, there’s possibly a variety of usage income.

one of my clients is having success with Pump, and Rumblefish securing $500 for one off deals on various songs, but things move very very slowly.

Reverbnation is useful as a tool, as is Soundcloud and Bandcamp, it’s worthwhile participating, but other than maintaining a professional presence and using some of the tools, it’s not a strategy in itself.

Online is basically what I do, I can offer creative as well as operational.

Some artists need 6 months just to get themselves established online. But however long it takes, you go to a game plan. Relentless barraging attacks!

You’re winning inch by inch, fan by fan until one weary cycle, the dam bursts forth and suddenly your cool enough to go viral for 5 minutes and new fans come spouting in.

What then? You keep going, you sell them stuff. You book gigs. You have a brand, you’re not nobody anymore, and you have permission and a note from your mother to say that you could consider this as a career.

But back to the nuts and weary bolts of your music marketing campaign because it’s that greulling yet inspired struggle that will slowly win you enough fans to matter enough to not have to work when you’re not making music.

I’d probably recommend we try to implement the structure of mini campaigns. 4-8 weeks in duration, one after the other.

involving at least:
1 video
1 newsletter
3-4 blog posts
1 ad campaign
1 “article marketing” campaign – this is a press release specifically designed to attract google ranking
+ social media interaction around the campaign (thats up to you to make sure seb is online everyday chatting about the themes of the mini campaign)

see this way if seb is using social media, and we’re doing some promo, then he has a THEME to talk about.

If you do 1 blog post a week, and each blog post has one intriguing tweet per day, and 4 blog posts can make 1 newsletter per month, you see how there’s a “content system” there that fans can be following continually?

to be realistic you want to be planning each campaign months in advance to ensure a smooth execution.

I’m not sure how long it would be to get traction from these, but if we don’t rely on participation we don’t need short term take up for it to succeed in attracting attention, and building the newsletter base.

that’s my suggestion, artists need to take up this challenge online to appear constantly active with these themed mini campaigns  drawing in new fans and continuing to be relevant to the growing fanbase while it grows to a critical mass.

At the moment I charge $US250 for 12 hours.

The point of the bomb which is about 15 hours, is to get you started and make it look like you are building up.

That will give you the numbers to get you started, but you need solid campaigns to turn on  real fans, you got some ideas there, but you need to strengthen your platform first.

You’ll need a newsletter especially as you’re already getting entrepreneurial:

a newsletter is the only place you can really sell stuff properly. Facebook, twitter, youtube are not going to let you turn their site into an e-commerce page, but you can just get away with selling more stuff through a newsletter. thats why I use it, and drive fans to the newsletter.

I can simply give your designers the code to work with but you’ve got to make it clear to fans that signing up is a good thing, because then you just set them up to be propositioned again and again, month after month.

The advertising is like facebook yes, but facebook is not really right for this kind of marketing unless you’re feeling rich. We are buying fans after all, so lets buy them cheaply and THEN see what they’re willing to buy.

You gotta get them signing up so you must think about that on the website, it’s gotta be clear as day. Otherwise you just got a fan who turns up, sniffs around, then goes away again to wait for your next facebook update or whatever, when you want to get those fans opening their wallets.

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